Tag Archives: scamp and dude

Our pick of… Pink for Boys

Whether you stand in solidarity with Adele on the gender neutrality or just want to dip a toe into the whole melange (maybe a lavender-painted one?) we have a few pink picks that are 100% masculine. And super cute.

Scamp & Dude’s pink rabbit tee is emblazoned with a neon Super Bunny, to warn off any baddies. He’s bad, he’s pink and he doesn’t care that he’s just wearing pants.

 

 

Swaddle a tiny boy-boo in a pink tiger, from the new aden+anais summer collection of adorable, breathable, do-it-all swaddles. And say Grr to Granny.

 

 

Hunter’s Kids’ backpacks are just as rugged as their welly boots, so the pink colourway knows no gender bounds. Also, check out the new ‘Panther Pink’ shade they have added to the boot range. Much more boy-friendly than their previous ‘Lipstick Pink’.

 

 

Tapir and Friends Pink Crocodile beaker is a ferociously pink way to serve a drink (maybe sugar-free Ribena or Charlie and Lola style pink milk?)

 

 

This Fisherman style sun hat looks super cool in bubblegum pink and keeps the rays off just as well as any other colour. Wide brim and chinstrap means it won’t fall off whilst BMXing…  (maybe on this BMX Star bike…?)

Talking to kids about terror…

image: CBS

The NSPCC has now published advice to help parents talk to their children about terrorism.

1. Listen carefully to a child’s fears and worries

It’s crucial to make sure their concerns are heard and not dismissed – once you know what they’re worried about, you can understand.

Acknowledge their fears instead of making them feel silly for being afraid.

2. Offer reassurance and comfort 

The NSPCC advises avoiding complicated and worrying explanations that could leave children more frightened and confused – instead, reassure and comfort them.

It’s important to remind children that they’re safe and surrounded by security.

3. Help them find advice and support 

Children can find it easier to understand distressing events and feelings by talking to services such as Childline, which is free, confidential and available 24/7.

Siobhan Freegard, founder of Channel Mum agrees it is important to approach the topic in an age appropriate manner.

“Talking to your children about terrorism is a horrible job, but a necessary one in the modern world and how you tackle it depends very much on their age,” 

“Very small kids really don’t need an in-depth explanation as they won’t be able to fully understand and it will only frighten them further. If you really need to say something, explain some people have ‘been very naughty and will get told off for it.’

Scamp and Dude dino sleep buddy

A quick ’round up of additional tips from some of our contributors:

‘Don’t make this a topic pre-bedtime, unless you want nightmares…’

‘Younger kids can understand the concept of good guys and bad guys, which might be useful here…’

‘Encourage them to make a gesture if they want to; from writing a poem or drawing a picture to lighting a candle…’

Need an extra cuddle at night? Check out Scamp and Dude’s Sleep Buddies, with a pocket for a picture of a loved one. For every Superhero Sleep Buddy sold another is donated to a vulnerable child via our chosen charities Don’t Forget the Kids, Grief Encounter and the leading London children’s hospital.