Tag Archives: survey

76% of Mothers with Young Children Want a Break from Parenting Duties this Mother’s Day

New 2017 research reveals we spend on average £38.50 on our mothers; up 5% from 2016
Flowers are still the most popular gift to buy, though just 4% of mothers with young children claim it is their preference

However, 91% of grandmothers would rather the gift of spending more time with their families on Mothering Sunday.

Liberty bouquet from Wild at Heart

With Mothers’ Day just around the corner, shops and restaurants are gearing up for an expected increase of sales and bookings in the coming weeks. In a survey commissioned by Onbuy.com, it was discovered that Brits are spending on average £38.50 on their mother’s yearly; up 5% from last year’s findings. Like other years, men were spending more on their mum’s (£42) than women (£35).
A survey of 1650 reveals the top five presents bought for mums (with the average spend) in the UK are: (1) Flowers- £35 (2) Taken out for family meal- up to £30 per head (3) Chocolate- £10 (4) Perfume- £40 (5) Homeware- £18.

Further analysis highlighted that presents such as flowers and chocolate relayed a gesture of appreciation and love, where such gifts are given to highlight a special purpose. Additionally, children taking their mums out for a meal allowed them to spend time together as a family, ensuring their mother felt special and valuable.

Jo Malone London Blooms collection

However, are these traditional gifts what mothers wanted?
In a mirrored survey of mothers with children aged 3-10, Onbuy.com discovered that these gifts held little value. Although much appreciated, after just a few years, many started to resent these generic “cheesy” gifts. In fact, it was found flowers were not so popular among mums, with only 4% admitting they would rather flowers over other presents.

When presented with a list of options for gifts, what came out as most popular in the survey was the following: (1) A relaxing spa day- 19% (2) Date Night- 17% (3) A quiet night in with wine- 14% (4) An extra three hours in bed-11% (5) No housework- 9%. Ironically, the survey highlighted that 76% of this group of mothers ultimately wanted a day off from parenting responsibilities on Mothers’ Day.
Additional analysis alternatively emphasised that those whose children were aged 18-30 favoured quality family time with their children (87%), highlighting the disparity between different stages of motherhood. Additionally, 96% of grandparents would in fact rather spend time with their families, with 56% claiming they felt neglected on Mothering Sunday.

Jam making set from Kilner Jars

In short:

What Mothers Get
1) Flowers
2) Taken out for a meal
3) Chocolate
4) Perfume
5) Homeware

What Mothers Want

1) A relaxing day at a spa
2) Date night
3) A quiet night in with wine
4) An extra three hours in bed
5) No Housework

Join the Tablet Debate – and donate to UNICEF

Should you let your child use a tablet?

A new research project, aimed at discovering the influence technology has on children’s learning, social interactions and play, from birth to 47 months, is being launched today.

Dr Elena Hoicka, and PhD students Stephanie Powell and Burcu Soy, from the University of Sheffield’s Department of Psychology, are looking to discover whether technology, such as tablets, is good for children’s development, bad, or a bit of both.

Parents across the world are invited to participate in the study by completing a survey at babylovesscience.com and repeating the survey six months later.

The survey asks questions about how long children use different types of technology – such as a tablet or a television – the previous day.

It also asks questions about how children prefer to learn, what children understand about other people, and whether and how children engage in pretend play. It only takes around 20-30 minutes to register and complete the survey.

Parents of children with low activities levels, such as newborns, are also invited to participate, as the researchers are interested in how technology impacts children right from the beginning.

At the end of the survey, parents will receive a summary of their child’s learning style, social understanding, and play.

Importantly, parents will be invited to repeat the survey six months later, which allows researchers to determine whether technology has an impact or not.

For every parent who completes the survey twice, six months apart, £2 will be donated to UNICEF.